Test prop gains

A stream of feedback flows through the Alcantara-wrapped steering wheel. Chevy resisted making the wheel as thick as a ­Burmese python and we’re grateful, not because our hands are tiny, but because the thin-rimmed wheel is the only delicate part on the entire car. That wheel, along with the lighter steering efforts afforded by the tour and sport modes, helps the big ZL1—it’s roughly the length of a Toyota Camry and three inches wider—read as small and nimble as a BMW M2 . Press hard into a corner and the ZL1 belies its mass by turning in with supernatural agility. There’s no drama, no roll, no fuss, and should you engage the rev-matching function, no need to heel-and-toe downshift.

The next level of filtering you can add is called a notch filter. This filter targets a very specific band of vibration and greatly reduces (attenuates) the effect of it on your flight control software. The primary benefit of the notch filter is it will further reduce the noise floor of your gyroscope, allowing better dampening. This means that you can tune propwash oscillations out of your quadcopter better than without the notch filter. A secondary benefit of the notch filter is allowing you to run flexible props that have harmonic vibration problems. We ran into just such a prop with the DAL 6045 tri-blades in our DAL review article. YouTube user Robogenesis made a great video showing how airmode works on soft props before and after notch filters were added:

Since Ruby and the introduction of RubyVM::InstructionSequence::load_iseq , we've been able to programmatically load ruby bytecode. By divorcing the process of running YARV byte code from the process of compiling ruby code, we can take advantage of the strengths of the ruby virtual machine while simultaneously reaping the benefits of a compiler such as macros, type checking, and instruction sequence optimizations. This can make our ruby faster and more readable! This talk demonstrates how to integrate this into your own workflows and the exciting possibilities this enables.

I’m a big fan of the Lean Startup movement and love the underlying principle of testing, learning, and pivoting by experimenting with the most basic product prototypes imaginable - so-called Minimal Viable Products (MVP) – during the search for product-market fit. It helps companies avoid building stuff that customers don’t want. Yet, there is no underlying conceptual tool that accompanies this process. There is no practical tool that helps business people map, think through, discuss, test, and pivot their company’s value proposition in relationship to their customers’ needs. So I came up with the Value Proposition Designer Canvas together with Yves Pigneur and Alan Smith .

Test prop gains

test prop gains

I’m a big fan of the Lean Startup movement and love the underlying principle of testing, learning, and pivoting by experimenting with the most basic product prototypes imaginable - so-called Minimal Viable Products (MVP) – during the search for product-market fit. It helps companies avoid building stuff that customers don’t want. Yet, there is no underlying conceptual tool that accompanies this process. There is no practical tool that helps business people map, think through, discuss, test, and pivot their company’s value proposition in relationship to their customers’ needs. So I came up with the Value Proposition Designer Canvas together with Yves Pigneur and Alan Smith .

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